Agenda

Day One : Tuesday, February 18, 2020

08:00

60 min

Registration and Continental Breakfast

10:00

15 min

Networking Break

10:15

60 min
Major James Lindsay

Machine Learning Applied to Cyber Security … This Time is Different?

Major James Lindsay, Chief Architect and Engineer of End Point Security, Department of National Defence

  • Is Machine Learning, when applied to cyber security, just a buzzword that is nearing the end of a hype cycle. Or has a fundamental shift in technology occurred that requires the cyber community to rethink how it delivers cyber security defence
  • Quick deep learning overview
  • Where is machine learning currently being used within cyber security
  • Potential existing applications of machine learning to cyber security issues
  • Geopolitical drivers of AI and machine learning adoption

11:15

60 min
Keith Jansa

How Standards Bridge the Gap Between AI Innovation and Implementation

Keith Jansa, Executive Director, CIO Strategy Council

  • Learn about how standards play a critical role in facilitating innovation and addressing the ethical use of artificial intelligence
  • Hear about the latest developments in the creation of Canadian standards for the digital space – from data governance to AI and cybersecurity
  • Discover partnership and thought leadership that is bridging the divide between public and private sector innovation
  • Explore novel use cases modernizing the toolkit for bringing AI products and services to market
  • Learn about how Canada is poised to provide an international benchmark for the next generation of AI talent to drive future certification and credentialing programs at the national, regional and international level

12:15

60 min

Luncheon

13:15

60 min
John Craig

Application of AI to Government Finance and Audit

John Craig, Director, Government & Integration Partnerships, MindBridge Ai

  • Financial data is being created exponentially, and current financial management and audit processes are failing to detect errors, omissions and fraud, together referred to as financial anomalies
  • Today, only specially trained analysts are able to review and detect financial anomalies, creating a resource bottleneck
  • AI allows for the democratization of analytics, allowing all financial managers and auditors to leverage analytics without specialized training
  • AI is 10x-30x more effective at detecting financial anomalies than current accounting methods
  • AI provides a way for finance officers to detect financial anomalies (fraud and mistakes) before the audit process, and for auditors to more rapidly perform audits, and focus in on risky transactions

14:15

60 min
John Lark

AI in the Public Sector – A Source of Uncertainty

John Lark, Co-Founder, Applied AI Canada Inc.

The arrival of computers and the Internet changed all aspects of our lives, Artificial Intelligence is similarly swiftly changing our world from predicting products you may want to purchase to analyzing medical test results and predicting. 

In response to this pervasive implementation of AI, the Treasury Board Secretariat has developed a Directive on automated decision making that comes into force on April 1, 2020 and which applies to any AI system developed or procured after April 1, 2020. The objective of the TBS Directive is to ensure that automated decision systems are deployed in the federal government in a manner that reduces risk to Canadians and to federal institutions, and in a way that leads to more efficient, accurate, consistent, and interpretable decisions.

  • The following techniques are specifically identified as related to AI: rules-based systems, regression, predictive analytics, machine learning, deep learning, and neural nets 
  • The presentation will touch on how to determine whether AI is a good fit for the problem you have or the operation you are thinking of modifying
  • There will be a question and answer session at the end to respond to specific areas of interest to conference participants

15:15

15 min

Networking Break

15:30

60 min
John Ogilvie

Building GC AI Clusters on Premises and in the Cloud

John Ogilvie, IT Architect, Bifrost Group

  • AI clusters require specific “High Performance Computing” IT equipment
  • GC users can deploy HPC/AI clusters on premises, in the cloud or at the shared GC HPC centre
  • What are the pros and cons of each approach?
  • What are the costs and schedules involved?
  • What does a ‘standard architecture’ look like for HPC/AI?

16:30

End of Day One

Day Two : Wednesday, February 19, 2020

08:00

60 min

Registration and Continental Breakfast

10:00

15 min

Networking Break

10:15

60 min
Alex Ramirez Gregory Richards Stéphane Gagnon

The Almost Mythical Expectations Concerning AI’s Impact on our Future

Alex Ramirez, Associate Professor, Information Systems, Sprott School of Business, Carleton University

Gregory Richards, Executive MBA Director and Adjunct Professor, University of Ottawa

Stéphane Gagnon, Associate Professor, Business Technology Management, Université du Québec en Outaouais

  • Jobs will disappear
  • Robots will be ubiquitous
  • Computers will anticipate our needs
  • Humans will be augmented by cybertechnology
  • Computers will play a major role in solving social problems

In this session, we will explore the “kernels of truth” contained in these expectations and discuss what’s real and what’s likely to emerge

12:15

60 min

Luncheon

15:15

15 min

Networking Break

15:30

60 min

What If We Are Not Prepared for AI in the Public Sector?

Ken Holmes, CMA Senior Analyst, Federal Government

Ken will build on former research presented at Infonex where he presented the economic and social change that drives increases in cyber-attacks; the dangers of artificial intelligence in control of dangerous nation and non-state leaders; and, the requirement for the audit and IT communities to work as one coordinated team to combat the negative challenges of the 21st Century.  This presentation focuses on the consequences if the IT community is not ready for AI and have neglected to deploy due diligence. Such failures are far deeper than most IT professionals realize. His presentation moves from defining what due diligence means though, to example scenarios on the costs and consequences in our era where due to Internet of Things results in overlap between public sector systems and the private sector.

  • Why is due diligence in the management and protection of systems and data essential in this era of AI generated cyber attacks?
  • Our IT systems are now the backbone that supports confidence in our economic systems. What happens when public confidence fails?
  • Public sector systems overlap with private sector systems. What happens when a substantive failure originates in a public system that affects private citizens and corporate profitability?
  • Three scenario examples illustrate the challenges that arise from the failure of IT managers to carry out due cyber diligence. 

16:30

End of Day Two